SUN PROTECTION FOR ALL

Skin cancer is the most common form of skin cancer in the United States, yet most skin cancers can be prevented.

Tuga sunwear about us

Why shop UPF 50+ swimwear?

Broad Protection? Tuga, SunBusters and certain PlayaPup styles (rash guards, hats) swimwear provide sun protection against both UVA and UVB sun rays.

Why UPF 50+ Swimwear? Have fun in the sun knowing that you and your family are protected from damaging UV rays when out at the beach or pool. UPF 50+ rated garments and accessories provide maximum sun protection.

Free of Sunscreen Chemicals? Unlike other swimwear brands, we do not use sunscreen chemicals in our swimwear. 

So what's UPF?

UPF stands for Ultraviolet Protection Factor and is a rating system to indicate the UV (Ultraviolet) protection provided by fabrics. UPF measures how much of the sun’s UV radiation is absorbed or “blocked” by fabric, effectively protecting the skin underneath. UPF ratings range from 15 to 50, and a higher UPF rating indicates greater protection. Garments that are rated UPF 50+ offer excellent UV protection. Tuga swimwear and accessories (the complete SunBusters line and PlayaPup rash guards and hats as well) are rated UPF 50+.

For example, a UPF rating of 25 indicates the fabric will allow 1/25th (4% or 96% UV blocked) of available UV radiation to pass through. An UPF 50+ rating offers the highest sun protection for garments, offering 98%+ protection.

Product image
Founder image

UVA vs UVB vs UVC

UV rays come from the sun or from a tanning bed, booth, or sunlamp to get a tan. When UV rays reach the skin’s inner layer, the skin makes more melanin. Melanin is the pigment that colors the skin. It moves toward the outer layers of the skin and becomes visible as a tan.

A quick guide:
1. UVA – most common, reaches beyond top layer of skin, leads to skin aging and wrinkling

2. UVB – less common, tends to damage more epidermal skin layers, leads to skin reddening and sunburn

3. UVC – very dangerous, but these are absorbed by the ozone layer and do not reach the ground

AVOID SUN TANNING and TANNING BEDS: A base tan is a sign of skin damage. 

SKIN CANCER RISK FACTORS

Skin cancer risk factors

Below is a list of risk factors that predisposes certain people to develop skin cancer. Please keep in mind that risk factors will vary for various types of skin cancer, but generally are:

  • A lighter natural skin color
  • Family history of skin cancer
  • A personal history of skin cancer
  • Exposure to the sun through work and play
  • A history of sunburns, especially early in life
  • A history of indoor tanning
  • Skin that burns, freckles, reddens easily, or becomes painful in the sun
  • Blue or green eyes
  • Blond or red hair
  • Certain types and a large number of moles

SOURCE: CDC.gov

Our skin burns or tans depending on our skin type, the time of year, and how much time we’re exposed to UV rays. The six types of skin, based on how likely it is to tan or burn, are

  • Always burns, never tans, sensitive to UV exposure
  • Burns easily, tans minimally
  • Burns moderately, tans gradually to light brown
  • Burns minimally, always tans well to moderately brown
  • Rarely burns, tans profusely to dark
  • Never burns, deeply pigmented, least sensitive

Although everyone’s skin can be damaged by UV exposure, people with skin types I and II are at the highest risk. The best way for people to prevent skin cancer is to protect themselves from the sun. 

SOURCE: CDC.gov 

The deadliest kind of skin cancer and most often caused by exposure to UV radiation. A change in your skin can be the most common sign of skin cancer. Remember that not all skin cancers look the same, but a new growth or a change in a mole are the first signs. Follow the ABCDEs of melanoma for early detection:

  • “A” stands for asymmetrical. Does the mole or spot have an irregular shape with two parts that look very different?
  • “B” stands for border. Is the border irregular or jagged?
  • “C” is for color. Is the color uneven?
  • “D” is for diameter. Is the mole or spot larger than the size of a pea (greater than 6mm)?
  • “E” is for evolving. Has the mole or spot changed during the past few weeks or months?

If you notice anything unusual about the appearance of your skin please consult your doctor and we strongly recommend an annual screening for early detection.

SOURCE: CDC.gov

SUN SAFETY TIPS

BE SUN SMART
Now that you know the damage that the sun can cause on your skin: from sunburns to pre-mature aging to the most damaging of skin cancers, here are some essential sun protection tips. Be sun smart, sun protection habits can start at any age. It’s never too late. 

sunscreen

1. SPF 30+ SUNSCREEN

Apply a broad spectrum sunscreen to protect against UVA/UVB, apply at least 15 minutes before going outside, re-apply at least every 2 hours and after swimming, toweling off, and sweating.

icon image

2. SUN PROTECTION CLOTHING

Long sleeve tops, pants and protective accessories are a must!

Shop swimwear
icon image

3. PROTECT YOUR EYES

Look for sunglasses with a UV 400 label to protect eyes against UVA/UVB rays, sun protection sunglasses reduce cataracts and other eye problems.

Shop sunglasses
sunscreen

4. SUN HATS

Cover the head, ears, neck, and face with a broad-brimmed sun protection hat.

Shop hats
icon image

5. REDUCE TIME SPENT IN THE SUN FROM 10am TO 4pm

The sun is strongest during these hours, seek shade if needed under trees, umbrellas.

icon image

6. CHECK THE UV INDEX

Provides vital information so you can plan your outdoor activities. The UV Index (UVI), according to the World Health Organization, is a measure of the level of UV radiation. 

U.S. UV IndexRest of the World

REMEMBER:Be cautious with reflective surfaces – water, snow, and sand reflect the sun’s rays so pay extra attention around these surfaces and don't sunbathe and stay away from tanning booths.

Tuga Sunwear and SunBusters swimwear lines of sun protection clothing (and PlayaPup sun shirts) take care of most of those sun safety measures when kids and adults (and pets) are at the beach and in the water. With the increasing rates of skin cancer, it is imperative that we teach good sun care habits at an early age.